You gotta love the brand design for Miss Cordelia’s by Perky Bros. The cafe’s brand identity is an experiment in traditional, classic design elements giving it a fun, home-like feel. Great typography with a great color palette tie the brand together nicely.

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Five & Dime Eatery is a brand that’s no frills and no extras. It’s simple from the logo throughout the other brand touch points. With a black and white color palette and solid design layouts, the brand is strong and steadfast. Great iconography and hierarchy of design makes the restaurant’s vibe a classic. Designed by Bravo Company.

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The Coffee Co-Op branding, by Jake Dugard, features strong, retro typography with a little new school flavor. The simple brown textures are expected, but work very well for the identity. Although this is a fictional project, it would work quite well in the real world.

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The branding and menu design for Docks restaurant by Jota Team, is simple and modern. The menu design features a rope element that ties visually to nautical imagery. Deep blue on top of whites and light grays make the brand reminiscent of water and sailing. The restaurant’s logo is a typographical experiment that’s well executed and interested to view. Overall this modern brand sends home the desired vibe effectively.

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The brand for Friedman’s Catering is bolstered by strong black and white photography that sets a tone of artsy, high end experiences. The logo itself is a simple scrawl of the word “Friedmans” in black and white as well. The entire brand itself is chic and it makes no excuses for its simplicity. It gives one the feeling that the food speaks loud enough. Designed by Nurit Koniak.

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The owners of former restaurant The Reserve knew they needed to make a change if they were going to draw people in from Baltimore’s Federal Hill neighborhood. Being just a few blocks away may seem like it’s not a big deal, but when it comes to choosing a dining experience it can be a deal breaker. They called in Chef Cyrus Keefer and Vigor to turn the tired restaurant brand into a reinvigorated experience. (Designed by Vigor, a restaurant branding firm)

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Corso 32′s restaurant brand was designed by Jesse Campbell. The brand is classic in its use of typography and imagery. With large black and white photography being the focal point of the interior. The quaint spot has a lot of personality to it and the brand is executed well in a subtle, yet strong way.

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Websites have a pretty low image in the heads of most restauranteurs. If i had a dollar for every time I heard something like “that should only cost a few hundred” or “my sister’s son does websites for cheap” I’d be rich. The fact is, websites are like cars: you can get a car with four wheels and a windshield for cheap, but what good will it do you?

The design and development of Station Street Hot Dogs is a case in great web site design. Not only is it awesome to see, it’s easy to use, clean, simple and a great experience all around. All the core features of what people want in a web experience are front, center and easy to access. Finally, it’s completely responsive; meaning that it reformats and maintains stellar design for smaller screens like iphone and ipads.

This is a brilliant job by Full Stop Interactive.

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The brand identity for Jacu is extensive. It’s a testament to how dynamic black/white can be as a color palette especially when using different techniques and textures. The team uses stamps, embossing, tip on labels and screen printing on top of standard commercial printing to keep expenses down while making the brand dynamic and interesting. Black ink never looked so good. Enjoy this extensive set of portfolio pictures brought to you by Havnevik. Found on Behance.

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UPDATE: The Jason’s Deli Branding showcased here is from 2007. There is a newer campaign under development to be released soon. We hope to get the opportunity to showcase it to you all.

The good folks over at Brains On Fire designed up this brand development work for Jason’s Deli. It’s a good example of building upon an existing brand to extend it and push the promise further. From t-shirts to carryout bags and some promotional marketing ads, the restaurant’s brand is a little refreshed and continues to grow.

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This phenomenal little cantina has a brand just as awesome as the physical location. Hand-drawn typography and a gritty brand style gives this place a rustic Mexican meets artsy vibe. I love the building and how everything from the logo to the posters to the website all have this urban decay kind of vibe. Great restaurant brand found via Art of the Menu. I think Happy Eyeballs did the design work, but if you’re the designer please comment so I can update the credit.

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Guirigall Restaurant’s interior design is excellent at portraying rustic, industrial-chic. Featuring tables formed from concrete, white walls, and wood accents, the restaurant is an exercise in minimal design that lets lighting and materials speak. Designed by Jota Team.

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The design for Lulu’s Urban Cupcakery is simple, quaint and cute. It’s exactly what one would expect from a boutique bakery. The design elements are simplea nd work well with the striped pattern. Use of a soft lemon yellow offset by a strong chocolate color complete the vibe. Great packaging, great design and a great brand by Laura Anderson.

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This brand is rustic in nature harkening to old authentic Mexican. With coyotes as the logo mark and strong, thick typography the brand is built upon using Mexican-style patterns. With decent photography and layout, the brand is strong and clear. Designed by STG54.

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Dulce is La Duni’s little sister. A coffeeshop to accompany the latin food destination brings in a contemporary flare with use of natural coffee-inspired colors and textures from wood. From the facade to the packaging, the Dulce brand stands up against the corporate coffee giants and provides a visual tone that people can easily approach. Designed by Tractorbeam.

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Phenomenal illustrations and hand rendered typography formĀ  the foundation of this food truck’s brand. Designed and illustrated by Michael Jeter, the cartoonish meets semi-Art Deco style is unique and creates a hunger just by glancing.

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C Food’s brand is supported by a black and white color palette and enlivened with a sea-like color turquoise. The simplistic brand uses illustrations and the letter “C” to drive home the identity throughout the restaurant’s touch points. I like the extra thought put into elements often overlooked, eg. table clothes and bathrooms. Well done by Daniel Waterhouse.

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Nothing starts off a strong restaurant brand than a strong typeface. Not just a font downloaded from the internet, but a hand-drawn type treatment that has personality. Lucy’s restaurant brand starts off just like that. From that foundation, a personality that’s truly unique is built through t-shirt/swag design, website, menus, and even the signage that pulls from vintage-style neon animated sign design ala Las Vegas. Great work from Pentagram.

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The brand for Felix restaurant is high brow and simplistic. It lets subtle design techniques build the brand so as to not be in-your-face. The design itself stands on its own in a no-nonsense fashion. Great work by Paperview.

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The branding for Nezinscot Farms, by Lindsay Perkins, is campy and fun. It utilizes the earthy, natural textures of the materials to offset and bolster the color palette and hand-rendered typography. Found on The Dieline.

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