Now this is comprehensive. Not just the photo set for the project, but how far they took branding their touch points. T=S Restaurant put their brand identity on every touch point possible. Including the skin of the fish they serve. Simple, poignant and strong, the brand stands on its own and is easily built upon through the restaurant’s interior design elements, printed materials and the other brand touch points a restaurant needs.

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Fun iconography bolstered by a strong black and white color palette makes Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory an upscale brand with retro/classic vibe. This is just a simple brand identity set, but it sets the stage for further the brand into packaging and other touch points. Designed by Chad Smith.

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The identity and menu design for Kind Bar is high contrast meets strong typography. Red being the driver of the brand, the menus are sleek and easy to read. Designed by Pannett Design. Found on Art of the Menu.

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A lot of the work I feature is simple, minimalistic design. Why? Because it works. It’s clear and engaging. However, every now and then I come across an uber-produced restaurant brand identity that breaks the mold. This is one such identity. The rustic, grungy treatments for the advertising and splatter effects create a vibe of freedom and artistry in the kitchen. The fiery colors evoke flavors and scents that make you want to try out La Fianna. Designed by Agree Studio.

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Tap jumped out at me from the start. Not just because of the graphic design, but also because of the production. It’s rare that a restaurant will take printing this far (see menu design.) The menu is a beast with full color graphic elements, and sheets that are interchangeable – a big plus for any restaurant that changes its menu seasonally. The graphic elements all seem to follow an infographic-like feel with diagrams and charts. Definitely something new and different. And, hey, it’s here in Atlanta so maybe I’ll be stopping in this weekend. Designed by Boy Burns Barn.

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The brand identity design for the restaurant, Taco Republic, boasts a handmade, street-style vibe. With strong reds, yellows, and browns, mixed with handdrawn typographical treatments, the branding captures the temperature and flavor of this tex-mex style taco joint. I love the heraldry in the logo treatment as seen on the shirt and the patch. I’d love to see some takeout packaging here to extend the brand further. Designed by Nosh Creative.

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Igloo’s identity is personified by a strong type treatment that mimics the texture of ice cream. It’s unique and stands out with it’s cyan graphic treatment. From foundation set by the logo’s type and color treatment a complete, well-designed brand identity is developed from touch point to touch point. Packaging, interior menu systems, take out bags, and other printed materials all not only carry the Igloo logo, but build upon the identity, too. Designed by Yotam Bezalel

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Steve Hamaker designed the brand identity and supporting brand elements for Urban Stack Burger Lounge. Black and white. Simple. Strong typography and a bit of wit here and there wrap up a strong brand identity for this restaurant experience. Everything down to the coasters was well thought out and executed to not just hold the logo, but extend the brand’s vibe and personality.

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This brand identity is for another side of the restaurant industry: restaurant groups. Restaurant groups need to take their brands seriously, as they become the overarching monument to their core values. No matter what concepts are under their umbrella, a restaurant group’s brand needs to focus on the elements that they value with regard to treatment of guests, treatment of employees, standards of operation, customer service and all the other elements that cross from restaurant brand to restaurant brand.

The design for Benchmarc restaurant group is simple and strong. It’s professional and adds a note of legitimacy. Designed by Brand Envy.

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Sugar-free sweetness. That’s the brand for Conperfection. A strong color palette that contrasts and pops and grabs attention with its simplicity. The stark white walls of the interior design make the colors pop even more and create a crisp, strong, and unified brand. Designed by La Tortilleria.

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Not an expansive study, but the brand identity for Fedora restaurant is still strong. The Art Deco influenced typeface gives an air of notoriety and classic luxury. Combined with a limited color palette it creates an upscale feel that doesn’t rely on anything but strong typography and color. The brand logo easily turns into a pattern as seen on the inside of the matchbook which is an unexpected design element that sends the restaurant’s brand home. Designed by STG54

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El Chuzo’s packaging features a quaint design with great color palette that shows how to bring a family of products together while remaining versatile enough for each product to have its own vibe. I love the everything from the simple, heavily typographical logo down to the clean package design that lets the colors speak. Designed by Tridimage.

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The brand for Metro Buffet & Grill is driven by photography, great photography. With a strong black, white, and red color palette it gives off a clean, crisp feel which are elements not usually found in your traditional buffet setting. I like the way the Asian characters follow the same style as the typeface used throughout. It adds continuity not often seen and not easily executed. Designed by Power Point Creative.

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Little Algiers is quaint and homey with an identity that’s uber geometric with perpendicular lines and fun typography. The use of old windows for menus is a great way to naturally let texture shine through and the simple forms, in general, create an approachable atmosphere. Designed by DesignWorks.

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I love the earthy simplicity of the brand identity for Egg Unlimited, a bakery and catering restaurant. It’s simple, yet interesting typography and limited color palette adds a note of warmth and approachability to the identity. The photography is well staged and the lighting is amazing. Designed by Studio Brave and found on DesignWorkLife

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This is an amazing way to interact with customers and a phenomenal example of the convergence of traditional and new medias. The cup in conjunction with the Starbucks App, launches an augmented reality piece that you can share and send to your friends, family and others. Just a little something extra that goes a long way. VIDEO AFTER THE JUMP! Found on the DieLine.

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Aschen Deli brings a warm, approachable atmosphere. The brand is solidly designed and easy to accept visually. With strong, creamy wood textures bolstered by strong black type and graphic treatments, the identity as seen in the interiors and printed pieces really shines. It’s as if it’s not trying hard to be anything but simply good. No excuses for its simplicity and therefore, it is confident. Designed by Bond Agency.

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The packaging and brand identity for good food is simple. Simple, crisp, and strong. It sets the expectation that the food itself will follow suit with no nonsense, great flavors. The advertising for the brand continues the simplicity with clean photography and simple typography. Overall, the brand doesn’t use gimmicks, just good design for Good Food. Designed by Face.

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Mangold’s, a vegetarian restaurant, underwent a huge renovation. Part of the renovation was rebranding the restaurant and updating its image. The people at Moodley handled the job of refacing Mangolds to visually tell a tale of “cool” vegetarian food. The new logo is a mixup of the letters in Mangolds. I’m not 100% on its interpretation though as it’s hard to read, but once understood it’s actually new an different. The rest of the identity, however; plays out very well and creates a fresh, crisp look for the restaurant. There are ton more photos at the Moodley site, but here are a few to view.

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The branding for County Line Harvest, conveys organic and natural while still renaming vibrant. The identity is marked by a bright, lime green as the epicenter of the brand’s color palette. Typographically it’s earthy and rustic. The packaging is well designed and definitely stands out. Designed by SEED, who explains the purpose:

County Line Harvest, an organic farm that focuses on specialty greens and has locations in both Northern and Southern California, needed an identity that was versatile enough to represent both County Line Harvest, their farm in the north, and County Line South, their farm in the south. Logos were needed for both farms that could work together but also apart. Their pop-up ‘Rogue Markets’ also needed to be incorporated into the brand family. We developed their entire identity and rolled out a website, produce boxes and marketing materials.

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