Websites have a pretty low image in the heads of most restauranteurs. If i had a dollar for every time I heard something like “that should only cost a few hundred” or “my sister’s son does websites for cheap” I’d be rich. The fact is, websites are like cars: you can get a car with four wheels and a windshield for cheap, but what good will it do you?

The design and development of Station Street Hot Dogs is a case in great web site design. Not only is it awesome to see, it’s easy to use, clean, simple and a great experience all around. All the core features of what people want in a web experience are front, center and easy to access. Finally, it’s completely responsive; meaning that it reformats and maintains stellar design for smaller screens like iphone and ipads.

This is a brilliant job by Full Stop Interactive.

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The brand identity for Jacu is extensive. It’s a testament to how dynamic black/white can be as a color palette especially when using different techniques and textures. The team uses stamps, embossing, tip on labels and screen printing on top of standard commercial printing to keep expenses down while making the brand dynamic and interesting. Black ink never looked so good. Enjoy this extensive set of portfolio pictures brought to you by Havnevik. Found on Behance.

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UPDATE: The Jason’s Deli Branding showcased here is from 2007. There is a newer campaign under development to be released soon. We hope to get the opportunity to showcase it to you all.

The good folks over at Brains On Fire designed up this brand development work for Jason’s Deli. It’s a good example of building upon an existing brand to extend it and push the promise further. From t-shirts to carryout bags and some promotional marketing ads, the restaurant’s brand is a little refreshed and continues to grow.

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This phenomenal little cantina has a brand just as awesome as the physical location. Hand-drawn typography and a gritty brand style gives this place a rustic Mexican meets artsy vibe. I love the building and how everything from the logo to the posters to the website all have this urban decay kind of vibe. Great restaurant brand found via Art of the Menu. I think Happy Eyeballs did the design work, but if you’re the designer please comment so I can update the credit.

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Guirigall Restaurant’s interior design is excellent at portraying rustic, industrial-chic. Featuring tables formed from concrete, white walls, and wood accents, the restaurant is an exercise in minimal design that lets lighting and materials speak. Designed by Jota Team.

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The design for Lulu’s Urban Cupcakery is simple, quaint and cute. It’s exactly what one would expect from a boutique bakery. The design elements are simplea nd work well with the striped pattern. Use of a soft lemon yellow offset by a strong chocolate color complete the vibe. Great packaging, great design and a great brand by Laura Anderson.

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This brand is rustic in nature harkening to old authentic Mexican. With coyotes as the logo mark and strong, thick typography the brand is built upon using Mexican-style patterns. With decent photography and layout, the brand is strong and clear. Designed by STG54.

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Dulce is La Duni’s little sister. A coffeeshop to accompany the latin food destination brings in a contemporary flare with use of natural coffee-inspired colors and textures from wood. From the facade to the packaging, the Dulce brand stands up against the corporate coffee giants and provides a visual tone that people can easily approach. Designed by Tractorbeam.

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Phenomenal illustrations and hand rendered typography form  the foundation of this food truck’s brand. Designed and illustrated by Michael Jeter, the cartoonish meets semi-Art Deco style is unique and creates a hunger just by glancing.

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C Food’s brand is supported by a black and white color palette and enlivened with a sea-like color turquoise. The simplistic brand uses illustrations and the letter “C” to drive home the identity throughout the restaurant’s touch points. I like the extra thought put into elements often overlooked, eg. table clothes and bathrooms. Well done by Daniel Waterhouse.

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Nothing starts off a strong restaurant brand than a strong typeface. Not just a font downloaded from the internet, but a hand-drawn type treatment that has personality. Lucy’s restaurant brand starts off just like that. From that foundation, a personality that’s truly unique is built through t-shirt/swag design, website, menus, and even the signage that pulls from vintage-style neon animated sign design ala Las Vegas. Great work from Pentagram.

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The brand for Felix restaurant is high brow and simplistic. It lets subtle design techniques build the brand so as to not be in-your-face. The design itself stands on its own in a no-nonsense fashion. Great work by Paperview.

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The branding for Nezinscot Farms, by Lindsay Perkins, is campy and fun. It utilizes the earthy, natural textures of the materials to offset and bolster the color palette and hand-rendered typography. Found on The Dieline.

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The brand identity and promotional materials for Cinc Sentits in Barcelona are the epitome of elegant and luxurious. Designed by Zoo Studio, the brand for this restaurant is marked by smooth textures and flowing patterns, offset by natural colors that root it in an earthy vibe. The packaging below envelopes the dessert and is sold through local retailers during the holiday season. In of itself, it pushes the brand further so those who encounter it can immediately understand what Cinc Sentits is all about. Found at The Dieline

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A super rustic, deconstructivist meets western design are some words you’d use to describe the branding for Jake’s Bar by Analogue. The mishmash nature of the typography and illustration make the brand lively and artsy. The menus for Jake’s bar play off of different themes from 80′s to futuristic creating unique personalities and different experiences.

Jakes Bar is a Leeds institution; it’s home to best cocktails in town and Analogue work closely with Jake and his team to maintain and develop the bar’s image and brand. This keeps things looking fresh, customers coming through the door and the competition at bay. The latest incarnation of the cocktail menu has been divided into drinks of the ages, showcasing some of the finest creations from the last 100 years of imbibing.

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Let’s start the week off with something sweet. Fruzen, designed by Johana Paez at 1000 Voltios, is a brand identity for a smoothie joint. Every from the name to the color palette is vibrant, fun and new. The colors are nearly fluorescent which gives this crisp, modern feel. I love the advertising poster designs for how the smoothies make you feel lighter because of their healthy nature. Great work.

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This identity has been making its way across the web this week with good reason. It’s an amazing example of simple, minimalist design with maximum impact. This comprehensive restaurant brand identity design covers all the bases using simple techniques that make an impact. It’s upscale and luxurious. It’s crisp. The typography is solid and poignant. The materials used throughout combined with the simplicity create a calming, elegant effect. It sets the expectations of the food and experience perfectly. Designed by Manual

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Now this is comprehensive. Not just the photo set for the project, but how far they took branding their touch points. T=S Restaurant put their brand identity on every touch point possible. Including the skin of the fish they serve. Simple, poignant and strong, the brand stands on its own and is easily built upon through the restaurant’s interior design elements, printed materials and the other brand touch points a restaurant needs.

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Fun iconography bolstered by a strong black and white color palette makes Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory an upscale brand with retro/classic vibe. This is just a simple brand identity set, but it sets the stage for further the brand into packaging and other touch points. Designed by Chad Smith.

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The identity and menu design for Kind Bar is high contrast meets strong typography. Red being the driver of the brand, the menus are sleek and easy to read. Designed by Pannett Design. Found on Art of the Menu.

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