The team at Urban Influence did a bang up job on this branding for a BBQ joint. Using the animal silhouettes is a nice touch on being suggestive, but not 100% blatant. Visual and verbal puns tie the pieces together with a campy tone while the color palette isn’t directly cliche for a BBQ restaurant. The brand is fun, rustic and inviting.

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Yea, it’s another hotel, but the work is top notch and worth showcasing. The Hotel Excelsior Latin in Paris was designed by Fabien Barrel (most notably from Graphic Exchange). His work is an amazing exploration in layers, colors and illustrations that end up in an extremely tactical, robust look. Truly unique. His branding work for the Hotel Excelsior is a prime example of this style in action as applied through the Hotel’s many touch points.

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Although it’s a hotel, the entire entity houses a restaurant and the brand that surrounds it is very well done. It ties the experience together from soup to nuts. Boy Burns Barn has brought the brand’s identity to the forefront throughout all touch points. The chartreuse is vibrant and modern. The zig zag pattern is sewn throughout the materials. All bundled up, it’s cohesive and strong.

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A fun bar and grill brand for Loggers, by Concussion. This one is great because it’s highly illustrative, but fun. There’s a hidden axe element in there, some plaid, who can’t love it?

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The brand identity for Country Restaurant is eclectic to say the least. It breaks convention in a good way. With the overlaying “C” formations in contrasting colors you get the feeling of uniqueness, different, interesting, etc. The identity is built upon with this vibrant meets muted color palette throughout the restaurant’s materials. The Mucca design website explains the angle:

In a restaurant, where you have a captive audience, it’s unnecessary to display the name of the venue everywhere, so we took the opportunity to create a dynamic system where the logo changes on each application. We used multiple letterforms, overlapping the “C” of Country to create 30-something distinct logos, so it can be visibly displayed without ever feeling overused. Using interesting printing details such as die-cutting, overprinting, and metallic inks gave the logo a rich, tactile feel that adds to the experience of the cuisine.


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Yeah, not a restaurant, but food related and that’s close enough for me. This is a school project by William Hastings. Everything from the color palette to the graphic treatments ties this brand identity together nicely.

 

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Club fliers are usually extremely gaudy and use a typical modern typeface that you’ve seen everywhere else. I came across these fliers/posters for the club Havana and felt they were such a breath of fresh air. They have a strong focal point and message. They aren’t afraid to employ a page hierarchy. They have white space that allows the piece to breathe and communicate. Great work by Face.

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Comprehensive upscale brand for a benefit night by Bell, called La Vittoria (designed by LG2 Boutique.) Personally, I think the use of gold can be often times gaudy and annoying. However, they seem to pull it off well with gold foil stamp accoutrements mixed with strong black and white design elements. This branding package is tied together nicely with every element extending the brand’s vibe.

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This is a smaller brand identity for a bagel shop. It’s a lot of fun though with good use of a two color palette and leveraging the bag material as a third color. The illustrations are fun as they use classic style, in a modern, fun way. Designed by Patrick Macomber of South Yall.

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Saba foodstore’s brand is a coupling of natural paper and materials with bright magenta pop. It’s vibrant without being too bright and stark. It’s natural without being boring. Designed by Creative Inc.

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Taverna Aventine restaurant’s brand was designed by Markatos Moore. The brand is classic in style with a touch of modern. Post production techniques and the use of white ink on natural paper stock makes the printed elements just jump off the page.

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Subplot‘s wicked minimal take on this bar’s brand is excellent. Simple. Clean, but has energy about it. It brings the experience of being there to the materials that represent. The red has so much energy and when overlayed on black and white photography it just hits the “casual and energetic” nail on the head.

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Way to kill convention and shun cliche! This design for an old school pizza shop in New Jersey touts an art deco, mechanical and engineered image; let’s say “stoic.” Strong typography and design. Unforgiving. The only warmth coming from the color palette for the restaurant’s identity and interior. Very industrial and it’s absolutely awesome to look at. Designed by Decoder.

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Guy Kawasaki chimes in on the MUFSO conference (multi-unit food service operator) with how to enchant customers. Simply put, ““The three key points of enchantment: You need to be likeable, trustworthy and [offer] quality. You want the quality of Apple; you want the trustworthiness of [online footwear peddler] Zappos; and you want the likeability of Richard Branson [of Virgin Atlantic Airways], who gets down on his knees and polishes your shoes so you will fly Virgin,” Kawasaki said.

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Kolachy Co restaurant branding by REThink is an exploration into iconography. The logo is simple, strong and memorable. The color palette, inviting. But the logo is extending through icons that support the items on the menu in such a creative way adding a unique design element that sends this brand out of the park. They describe the client as such:

Kolachy Co. is a Vancouver-based grab-and-go food shop. They produce healthy, handmade food at all three of their locations. The restaurants serve delicious handmade breakfasts, lunches, soups and snacks.

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Shibuya is a quaint identity featuring a refreshing color palette. It’s not cliche, but doesn’t abandon nods to Asian culture either. The menu treatments are just as well thought out with an interesting use of bamboo. Designed by Ai Carver.

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This identity has made its rounds around the webspace, and for good reason. It’s very well done and a superb example of a Constructivist style made modern. The business cards are eye catching and different. The rest of the identity touts strong typography, limited color palette and generally lets the simplicity speak for itself. Designed by Salih Kucukaga, he describes the angle:

Identity design for an Istanbul based restaurant where you can have delicious meals in a young, vintage style factory atmosphere
with an urban feel. Fabrikk comes from the latin word Fabrica which means “Factory” in English.

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This Russian bar’s identity by Katarina Teterkina is fun, whimsical and definitively inviting. Unfortunately, I have no clue the name of the bar because it is in fact, in Russian. However, you can easily see how she’s tied the brand together with visual cues and accoutrements creating a unified vibe. I like how she’s turned the typography into actual characters using quaint “costumes.” It adds a life to the bar’s brand.

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